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A Guide to Casting Farther: How It’ll Elevate Your Tight Line / Euro Nymph Game

Unlocking the full potential of Euro nymph and Tight-line nymphing techniques requires breaking free from the misconception that they're only suited for short-range fishing. Delve deeper into the art of casting farther, and you'll discover a realm of possibilities that can transform your fishing experience. Here are three compelling reasons why mastering the skill of casting farther is essential for most tight line anglers.

MONO RIG vs EURO NYMPH: What’s the difference- Which is better?

Both the mono Rig and ESN (Euro Style Nymphing) fall under the umbrella of Tight Line Nymphing. Both utilize long leaders suspended above the water’s surface for a better dead drift, with less drag than a floating line set up- Often referred to as “High Sticking.” But what’s the difference between the two systems, and which is better?

Netting trout is a skill in and of itself. It’s something that takes a lot of practice to get good at and only experience makes you better. It’s not something you can really practice in your backyard like casting and knot tying- it’s something you must do in the water and it’s something you must think about even before your net is drawn. In some cases, even before you make your first cast.
When I started Euro nymphing, Contact nymphing, Czech nymphing, whatever you want to call it, I was confused as to what gear I would need and why it was different from what I already had. As I became familiar with the new techniques I realized why it required different gear. I’m going to share what I’ve learned so you can avoid some of the mistakes I made early on. I’ll save you some frustration and maybe even save you some money.

*Keep in mind that my advice is based solely on wade fishing in technical high sierra rivers and streams for trout- It doesn’t pertain to stillwater, drift boats, steelhead or other large fish. Just river trout. OK?

I designed the Stinger reel to save weight. People ask “why,” so I wrote this because I realized that the answers are not so obvious, especially to those who have been fishing the same way for decades.

Lightweight and high performance are synonymous terms with regards to competitive sports equipment- the world I came from. Lightweight almost always improves performance because mass and inertia are your enemies when trying to increase quickness, accuracy and or maximize endurance. But what does high performance have to do with fly fishing? Lots.

If you’re new to ESN (European Style Nymphing) fly fishing you probably have lots of questions regarding tippet line. There’s very little information out there because tippet setup is specific to types of water, fish, conditions, etc. Here’s how I rig my tippet and why. 


First the basics. Tippet is the thin clear portion of the leader that attaches the fly. It’s thin to cut through the current and minimize drag, and clear to not spook the fish. In Euro-nymphing tippet takes much more abuse because it makes frequent contact with rocks and gravel down at the bottom, so fluorocarbon is used because it is more abrasion resistant than nylon. And because fluorocarbon it tougher I can use thinner tippet than Nylon.